Two takes on Hawaiian poke

With several more poke-devoted eateries opening in Auckland recently, New Zealand seems to be fully embracing a dish that has been making a buzz in places like LA for a while, and in Hawai‘i for, well, centuries.

Poke, which according to some sources is pronounced ‘poh-kay’ and others ‘poh-keh’ (this seems more likely to me, seeing it’s a Polynesian language), means ‘to cut’ or ‘section’, referring to the raw fish that is the star of the show.

 

I found two recent cookbooks focusing on the tasty bowl-food. Poke: Hawaiian-inspired sushi bowls by Celia Farrar and Guy Jackson of Eat Poke in London has an abstract pop-art style cover and a more fast-and-loose approach to ingredients, while The Poke Cookbook: the freshest way to eat fish by Martha Cheng sticks with a more trad food-pic cover and ingredients (though it does have a ‘modern’ section). Both include seafood and vegetarian versions. Cheng’s book also includes a section called ‘Local Style’, which has recipes for Hawaiian favourites like kālua pig (pork ‘butt’ cooked in an underground imu), butter mochi (a chewy, custardy baked treat) and lychee fizz, and Farrar and Jackson include a drinks section, with both alcoholic and booze-free offerings.

I’ve flagged many recipes in both of the books for my next trip to the seafood market, but the spirit of poke is versatility – it’s more about the style of preparation than sticking to particular ingredients – so in that spirit, I made up my own combination based on what we had at home.

Our compile-your-own poke bowls featured a mix of brown basmati and red rice; ribbons of purple and orange carrot; thinly sliced radish, red capsicum, spring onion, avocado (hooray that they are no longer the price of an Auckland house deposit) and iceberg lettuce for crunch; rehydrated dried seaweed from the Asian supermarket; and trevally marinated in lemon juice and coconut cream and combined with diced cucumber, tomato and red onion and perked up with a little minced fresh chilli. Because condiments are everything, we topped it all off with drizzles of kewpie mayo, soy sauce and sesame oil and sprinklings of my homemade furikake (made using seaweed collected from the local beach; you can find the recipe here) and chopped roasted and salted macadamias. As we were putting it all together, it felt a bit odd adding nuts to a meal that takes its cues from Japanese cuisine, but the crunchy, creamy macadamias – a staple of traditional Hawaiian poke – really make this dish.

Despite the fairly long list of ingredients, one of the joys of poke is the simplicity of preparation: chop everything up roughly the same size and serve over rice, or if you fancy, just veg. You don’t necessarily have to prepare a marinated fish, either – unadulterated thinly sliced or cubed raw fish is a marvellous thing, as long as you can get your hands on very fresh fish.

Now the library-book test (am I happy to return it, or do I want to renew my loan so I can savour it longer, or buy the book?). I admit that in this instance, I am judging a book/books by the cover, and buying Celia Farrar and Guy Jackson’s version.

The Poke Cookbook: the freshest way to eat fish by Martha Cheng (Clarkson Potter, 2017) and Poke: Hawaiian-inspired sushi bowls by Celia Farrar and Guy Jackson (2017).

2 thoughts on “Two takes on Hawaiian poke

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